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Bridges

Ten bridges span the River Severn as it loops around Shrewsbury, carrying people and goods into the town centre.

CASTLE FOOTBRIDGE – The new bridge was built in 1951, and was the first pre-stressed, post tension, reinforced concrete, counter balanced cantilever bridge to be built in the country.

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THE WELSH BRIDGE – A Welsh Bridge, near this Site, existed by 1155.  By the 1600s the area was the centre of commercial activity with barges unloading wine, tobacco, fruit and dye on Mardol and Frankwell Quays. The existing bridge was completed in 1795.  Thomas Telford,the great engineer, then County Surveyor, disapproved of the site and was justified 25 years later when the scouring effects of the river were found to be undermining the river bed below the foundations. Work on the foundations over, the years has enabled the bridge to survive.

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FRANKWELL FOOTBRIDGE – Built to a design by Mott, Hay and Anderson and opened on the 5th July, 1979. The fine cable stayed steel box girder bridge supported from a single concrete tower has a main span of 48 metres and connects the Frankwell Car Park to the Riverside Shopping precinct.

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THE KINGSLAND BRIDGE – Opened in 1882, by the KingsIand Bridge Company, this facilitated the move ofSbrewsbury School to Kingsland the same year and helped to establish the area as a wealthy Victorian suburb.  The bridge is constructed of iron resting on stone piers, and has a single span of 212 feet.  Known locally as the Penny Bridge, the toll for pedestrians was one old penny 1d.  In the 1970’s and after metrification, permiSsion was granted from the Department of Transport to raise the toll to the new halfpence, (1/2p) and then to one pence, (1p).  Up until then it was therefore still the Penny Bridge.  However, the Kingsland Bridge Company again was granted an increase in 2011 to 20p.

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THE PORT HILL BRIDGE – This is a ten foot wide suspension bridge of latticed steel providing a pedestrian link between the Quarry and the suburb of Port Hill.  The bridge opened in 1922 and was largely paid for by the Shropshire Horticultural Society.

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GREYFRIARS BRIDGE – Opened in 1880, the footbridge replaced a ferry boat crossing between St Julian’s Friars and Coleham, and relieved some of the congestion on the narrow footpaths of the English Bridge.  It is constructed of two lattice girders of wrought iron on piers of solid masonry and a concrete foundation.

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IRON RAIL WAY BRIDGE – This was cast at Coalbrookdale It is a double arch iron railway bridge, built by William Baker in 1848, and carries the Shrewsbury to Wolverhampton line over the Severn.

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THE ENGLISH BRIDGE – From the earliest times there has been a crossing point at, or near, the site of the present English Bridge.  For some seven hundred years there were two bridges, connecting the foot of Wyle Cop to Coleham Head, and Coleham Head to the Abbey.  The ‘new’ bridge was opened in 1774.  In 1925 the bridge was dismantled and completely reconstructed in order to reduce its steep gradient and widen the carriageway from 23 ft to 50ft.  The panel at the crown of the bridge, on the north side, commemorates its completion.

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THE TELFORD WAY BRIDGE – This bridge opened in 1964 carries the Ditherington to Monkmoor link road. It is a double cantilever and suspended span type in pre-stressed reinforced concrete, is 298 feet long with pier foundations sunk to 18 feet below the river bank level.

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SEVERN RAILWAY VIADUCT – The foundation stone was laid in 1847 and the bridge constructed with seven arches each with a 45 foot span.  It was completed before the Shrewsbury to Birmingham railway line which was operating from 1849.  The bridge still carries the railway.